© 2018 by Sheffield Chamber Players

a 501(c)3 non-profit organization

Sheffield Chamber Players

9 Arborway Terrace

Boston, MA 02130

This program is supported in part by a grant from the Boston Cultural Council

and administered by the Mayor’s Office of Arts and Culture.

2018-2019

 

September - October

String Quartet Op.33 No.2 The Joke                                        Franz Joseph Haydn
Entr’acte                                                                                Caroline Shaw 
String Quartet No.1 Op.50                                                     Sergei Prokofiev 

Surprise, Transformation and, of course, Magic. What better way to celebrate the opening of our anniversary season than by exploring some of our favorite traits in chamber music! Haydn's famous knack for smashing expectations is on full display in the absolutely gorgeous (and hilarious) Op. 33 No.2 quartet, while Caroline Shaw's Entr'acte explores some of her favorite features of Haydn's Minuets, occasionally poking a little fun at the old man along the way. Speaking of fun and wit, no one has yet outdone Prokofiev in either. His first quartet starts off with vigorous and playful energy and ends in a soulful lullaby ignoring all the canons of the genre.

 

October - November

artwork by Laura Thurbon

String Quartet No.1 in C Major                                                Dmitri Shostakovich
String Quartet No.15 in A minor, Op. 132                                Ludwig van Beethoven

Shostakovich wrote that he "visualized childhood scenes, somewhat naive and bright moods associated with spring" when writing his first string quartet. The optimism and happiness of this work contrasts with the drama of his recently completed 5th Symphony, but his unique voice is nevertheless heard in full force here.

As Beethoven recovered from what he had feared would be a fatal illness, he wrote his extraordinary String Quartet Op. 132. He titles the 3rd movement, "Heiliger Dankgesang eines Genesenen an die Gottheit, in der lydischen Tonart" ("Holy song of Thanksgiving of a Convalescent to the Deity, in the Lydian mode"). This movement is one of the most sublime, hopeful expressions of deep gratitude and love of life.

 

January - February

From the Heart

Drobnosti Op. 75a                                                                 Antonín Dvořák
Strum                                                                                    Jesse Montgomery 
String Quartet in E flat Major                                                   Fanny Mendelssohn

Program three features heartfelt works by three masters, two from the Romantic era, and one from the present who shares from her own intimate experience and love of the string quartet. Dvorak's Drobnosti is also known as Four Romantic Pieces for Violin, and they are heartbreakingly lovely. Jesse Montgomery's Strum is both a unique meditation on the resonance and warmth of the string quartet, and a flirtation with the romance of guitars and "strummed" instruments. We close with Fanny Mendelssohn's Quartet in E flat. At turns powerful and tender, playful and passionate, this work carries on the great quartet tradition of Beethoven and at times echoes her brother Felix's works, but in her own distinct voice. This Valentine of a program promises to bring some warmth into some dark winter nights.

 

April - May

2+2=5

Duos for 2 violins                                                                    Bela Bartok and Kenji Bunch
Waltz                                                                                    Andy Stein 
Limestone and Felt                                                                   Caroline Shaw
Cello Quintet op. 34                                                               Johannes Brahms

How does the greatest music always seem to add up to more than its constituent parts? Our final program of the year explores how instruments, ideas and personalities combine to create surprising and beautiful results. Our program splits the ensemble and journeys through three small duet masterpieces by living American composers, Kenji Bunch, Caroline Shaw and Andy Stein, and then comes back together with one of the greatest works of the western world, Brahms’ Quintet in F minor, here set for string quintet as it was originally conceived.